Succulents

10 Most Beautiful Types of Flowering Succulents

Are you looking to add some delightful flowering succulents to your collection? Then read on as we choose our top 10 picks.
Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr

Want to add more color to your living space or garden? Start with succulents! Most people don’t even know that some succulents species can produce gorgeous flowers all year round. And they are quite colorful. Of course, these desert plants need proper care and an environment to thrive in. But don’t worry, the list is not long or demanding.

Succulents are generally low maintenance, so you don’t have to follow strict guidelines to make them grow. They only need well-draining soil to thrive, proper sun exposure, and that’s about it. But if you want to enjoy the flowers, some species could require a particular set of rules. So let’s dive in and get to know some of the most beautiful types of flowering succulents!

Where to Buy Succulents?

Here is our recommended online shops for purchasing succulents & supplies

  • Succulents Box

    Succulents Box currently offers more than 200 varieties of succulents (both popular and rare ones) along with 5 monthly subscription boxes.

    Visit Store
  • Leaf & Clay

    Leaf & Clay offer a range of hundreds of types of succulents along with subscription boxes, pots & macrame.

    Visit Store
  • Lula’s Garden

    Lula’s Garden offers a selection of succulent garden gift sets from small single succulents in pots to full succulent gardens.

    Visit Store
  • The Succulent Source

    The Succulent Source offers a huge selection of succulents, cactii and also gift sets and items for weddings.

    Visit Store
  • Planet Desert

    Planet Desert cater to succulent and cactii fans with a large range of plants, soil, kits and other supplies for creating your garden.

    Visit Store

Echeveria

Originating from South America, echeveria is one of the most popular flowering succulents out there. The gorgeous rosette-forming leaves come in different colors, depending on the species. And there are more than 100 echeveria species to choose from. The most common ones are green or grayish-green, but you can find red and dark purple echeveria plants.

Flower of a Echeveria peacockii,
Flower of a Echeveria peacockii,

This succulent doesn’t need too much water. It is drought-tolerant, so it is ideal for plant lovers who can be a bit forgetful about the watering schedule. The amount of water depends on the weather. If it is warm, you might need to water the succulent more often. It might be best to wait until the soil is completely dry to avoid root rot.

Echeveria loves sunshine, so keep it in a bright place where it can get enough light. It will start blooming when you place it in direct sunlight. The flower should appear even if you keep it indoors! The succulent will begin to develop a green stem with a pink flower on the top. The tips of the flower could be yellow or red. Unfortunately, once your echeveria blooms, the plant will die.

Conophytum calculus

Conophytum calculus, also known as Marble Buttons, is striking and unusual. It is native to South Africa and Southern Namibia. This succulent stands out right away because it has individual round leaves that are on a smaller side. These are usually greenish and very smooth. The leaves are fascinating because as an old one withers, a new one appears from the inside. New leaves are growing all the time.

Conophytum calculus
Conophytum calculus

If you have a garden, conophytum calculus will fit right in. This succulent loves full exposure to the sun, but partial shade works just as well. Make sure you give it at least four hours of direct sunlight every day. There is no need to water it all the time. Conophytum calculus is prone to root rot, so always check if the soil is dry before you water this succulent.

You can keep it outside all year round because this succulent can survive both cold and warm weather. The flowers usually appear in fall. They are stemless and yellow or orange. The blossoms are impossible to miss since they appear at the top of the plant. However, they will open up only during the night. Conophytum calculus is a nocturnal plant, after all.

Tacitus Bellus

Tacitus bellus grows in Northern Mexico and is a perennial succulent that forms compact rosettes. The leaves are attractive since they are triangle-shaped and have a bit of bronze tint to them. This succulent doesn’t need a lot of sunshine. It grows on cliffs in the wild, so make sure you keep it in a place that has enough shade. Taking care of this succulent might be tricky since it requires low temperatures to bloom.

Tacitus Bellus
Tacitus Bellus

However, tacitus bellus is an expert in surviving freezing temperatures and don’t need a lot of water all year round. It is best to wait until the soil is dry to water it. It is essential in winter because tacitus bellus can develop root rot. The weather will already be humid, so you can wait a bit longer before you water this succulent.

Blossoms usually emerge from May to July. The star-shaped flowers are eye-catching due to their incredibly vivid colors. They range from deep pink to red. Each flower has five petals and lasts for a couple of weeks, which is more than enough for you to enjoy the pleasant sight.

Graptopetalum Superbum

Graptopetalum superbum is native to Mexico. This succulent is easy to take care of. It has thick leaves in various colors. They range from pale grey to lavender and pink. It forms almost flat rosettes that are close to the ground. The plant will create a small colony over time, so think about hanging your container. Just like every succulent, graptopetalum superbum enjoys sunlight and needs a lot of it to grow.

You should plant it in well-draining soil and do your best not to overwater this plant. It needs extra moisture during summer, but keep it minimal in the winter months. You could use fertilizer once a year, but it is not mandatory. Too much water could cause root rot, so be careful. Pests can sometimes attack this succulent. Inspect the area around the leaves now and then.

Superbum blooms in late winter and spring. The star-shaped flowers create a contrast with the leaves so that the plant will look stunning. Keep in mind that there will be more than just one flower. They can bloom indoors as well, so you are free to keep them in containers. The flowers are usually yellow, with red speckles on the tips.

Oscularia Deltoides

Oscularia deltoides is better known as Pink Ice Plant. It originates from South Africa and is a perfect addition to any rock garden. When found in the wild, this tough little succulent grows on sandstone rocks in dry conditions. It produces a bunch of flowers that can add a lot of color to your surroundings.

Oscularia Deltoides
Oscularia Deltoides

You may grow this succulent both indoor and outdoor. If you decide to keep it inside, place it near a south or west-facing window because it needs sunlight. Oscularia deltoides have tiny leaves that are blue or green, triangular, and a bit jagged. They sometimes have red or pink edges. The succulent can survive low temperatures for a short time. You could water them more frequently during the summer months, but these plants don’t need extra attention.

Besides cute triangular leaves, oscularia deltoides produce plenty of flowers. Magenta colored, these are typically all over the succulent. The flowers emerge in spring and have a pleasant scent to them. Once in bloom, oscularia deltoides will look amazing in hanging containers. Since this is a low growing succulent, the flower will spill out.

Donkey Tail Sedum

Donkey tail sedum or Burro’s tail might be one of the more popular succulents out there. It is native to Mexico and Honduras. This plant grows slowly and has rows of tightly packed fleshy leaves. These are tear-drop shaped and typically green in color. While you can grow donkey tail sedum both indoors and outdoors, it rarely blooms when kept inside. So if you want to see its lovely flowers, keep this succulent in your rock garden.

Donkey Tail Sedum
Donkey Tail Sedum

This plant loves warmth and sunlight. If you plan to grow it indoors, place a container near a window with at least a couple of sunshine hours every day. On the other hand, be careful not to keep it in direct sunlight all the time when you grow it outside. Find a nice place with partial shade, and your donkey tail sedum will do just fine. It is important not to water this succulent all the time. Instead, you can forget about it occasionally. Just like almost every succulent, it thrives on neglect.

The only thing you need to be mindful of is how you handle this succulent. The leaves are fragile and could fall off easily. Donkey tail sedum blooms in late summer, and flowers might not be noticeable initially as they grow under the leaves. The flowers are smallish and could be red, yellow, or white. Remember that only mature donkey tail sedum plants produce flowers.

Sedum Rubrotinctum

Sedum rubrotinctum, or Jelly bean plant, is a cute succulent that is a common sight in rock gardens. Its leaves look like jelly beans, hence the nickname. Usually green, the leaves will change color to red during summer when exposed to more sunlight. It can grow in various climates, but will not tolerate frost. Therefore, it might be best to plant it in a container so you can bring the succulent inside once the temperature drops.

Sedum Rubrotinctum
Sedum Rubrotinctum

Just like most succulents, sedum rubrotinctum is not a needy plant. It is not picky about soil as long as it is well-drained. Water it more frequently during the summer, but first, check if the soil is dry. It is essential to mention that sedum rubrotinctum can be toxic to cats and dogs, so make sure your pets don’t go near it.

This plant blooms in spring, but sometimes the flowers could appear in late winter. It will produce little yellow flowers that grow in clusters between the leaves. They are star-shaped and create a beautiful contrast with the green leaves. The flowers will last for weeks, making your garden or room more enjoyable.

Hylotelephium Sieboldii

Hylotelephium sieboldii, commonly known as October daphne, is a perennial native to Japan. This succulent has round leaves that grow very low to the ground. They are usually green or blue. October daphne can tolerate almost every climate, and the plant doesn’t mind freezing winters or hot summers. It likes direct sunlight, so don’t keep it in the shade.

Hylotelephium Sieboldii
Hylotelephium Sieboldii

This succulent only requires well-draining soil. You can fertilize it, but it is not mandatory. October daphne will continue to grow even if you forget about it. It is best to wait until the ground is dry before you water this succulent. Overwatering can lead to fungal overgrowth. Slugs and snails are drawn to this plant, so watch out if you decide to keep it outside.

October daphne will bloom in late summer or early fall. It produces small clusters of flowers that grow on stems, and many flowers will go in different directions. The pink flowers are star-shaped. We have to mention that this succulent is mildly toxic to humans and animals, so keep your furry friends away.

Sempervivum Arachnoideum Emily

Sempervivum arachnoideum Emily or Emily Cobweb Houseleek is a fast-growing succulent that forms beautiful rosettes. The leaves are usually green with a touch of red at the tips. They can go completely red when exposed to too much sunlight or cold. It loves partial shade, but this succulent can adapt to any weather condition.

Sempervivum Arachnoideum
Sempervivum Arachnoideum

Emily cobweb houseleek may require more water during the growing season. However, wait until the soil is dry. Just like with other succulents, overwatering is bad for the roots. Also, hold back on water when temperatures go low. Pests don’t attack this succulent, but it is very attractive to bees.

What makes it super interesting is the flower. It grows on a very tall stem, towering above the plant. The stem is also covered with tiny leaves and has a slight copperish tint. The flowers are pink or red. Once it blooms, a succulent will die. Don’t worry because you will probably have dozens of offsets in a container by the time this happens.

Final thoughts

Even though succulents are usually planted in rock or Mediterranian gardens, these plants can look great in any setting. There are many more types of flowering succulents out there, but remember that each of them requires different conditions to bloom. Luckily, succulents, in general, can grow in various climates.

Succulents can bloom at any time of the year, regardless of the temperature. Some flowers might appear in winter, which is a bit cool. But it all depends on the succulent species you have. So if you want a unique plant that produces breathtaking flowers but is also low-maintenance, look no further. Succulents are an excellent choice for anyone who sometimes forgets to water the plants. And they have flowers too!

555 views

Ana is an experienced writer and an urban gardener, making use of limited space on her balcony to grow vegetables every season. She got into gardening thanks to her grandmother, who introduced her to the wonderful world of succulents. Two of them still collect succulents as well as cacti together, and Ana is always on the lookout for rare (and colorful) varieties. She is currently occupied with growing avocado trees indoors.

Write A Comment